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Would you like to be able to make ringtones for your iPhone from the songs you've purchased? For free?
We can show you how. Whether you're a Mac or a PC, we have some simple, step-by-step instructions that will soon see you rocking out to your music of choice every time you have an incoming call.
Take a look through our walkthrough in the gallery above. In the comments below, let us know which tune you chose to convert into a free ringtone.
How to Make Free Ringtones

How to Make Free Ringtones in iTunes 2015

Would you like to be able to make ringtones for your iPhone from the songs you've purchased? For free?
We can show you how. Whether you're a Mac or a PC, we have some simple, step-by-step instructions that will soon see you rocking out to your music of choice every time you have an incoming call.
Take a look through our walkthrough in the gallery above. In the comments below, let us know which tune you chose to convert into a free ringtone.
How to Make Free Ringtones

Cyber-monday
Cyber Monday is the day retailers love and hate. They love the huge revenue potential, but hate the pressure to perform.
However, the phenomenon is now a well-established consumer holiday, so it's important to avoid a technical meltdown. And even if your site is stable and responsive, there are still ways to grow your sales on Cyber Monday.
Assuming you’ve got the basics in place, these seven practices can maximize sales in this critical period.

1. Be real time.

Trends and fashions develop fast during this intense shopping movement. The latest gift craze or must-have toy can change in a matter of hours. If you want to maximize sales, track activity in real time and respond in immediately with creative merchandising and offers. If you’re only reviewing analytics occasionally, you’re going to miss a trick. And if your competitors see the trends first, you could lose out badly.

2. Think about the weather.

Weather can have a huge impact on shopping habits at any time of year, but it's particularly important during the holiday season. Simple trends, such as increased reliance on online shopping during heavy snow, can be leveraged to drive sales. More subtly, a colder than normal holiday period will lead to increased demand for wintry gifts, which you can match through creative marketing and product presentation.

3. Think about location.

Offline stores have long taken it for granted that they serve local shoppers, not some imaginary national archetype. After all, a shopper in California might have a different gift list from one in New York, and you’ve got to recognize and respond to those demands. But the ability to serve different sites to users in different locations is a must if you want to increase your conversions over this competitive period.

4. Think about content.

Holiday shopping is one of the least focused retail missions of the year; shoppers roam virtual aisles in search of the ideal gift. Therefore, it's the time of year when retailers can influence a shopping mission through content and merchandizing. Preparing creative and colorful gift guides via video or text can help the confused shopper make his retail choices on your site, rather than your competitor's.

5. Manage abandonment.

With the lack of shopper focus, basket abandonment can be a real issue; indecisive shoppers put products in their virtual baskets before heading elsewhere, many times without completing the purchase. However, abandonment doesn’t necessarily mean a lost customer — follow up with registered users via email. On-screen messages might jog their memory, too, reminding them to come back and complete their shopping journey.

5 Tips for Brands Participating in Cyber Monday 2015

Cyber-monday
Cyber Monday is the day retailers love and hate. They love the huge revenue potential, but hate the pressure to perform.
However, the phenomenon is now a well-established consumer holiday, so it's important to avoid a technical meltdown. And even if your site is stable and responsive, there are still ways to grow your sales on Cyber Monday.
Assuming you’ve got the basics in place, these seven practices can maximize sales in this critical period.

1. Be real time.

Trends and fashions develop fast during this intense shopping movement. The latest gift craze or must-have toy can change in a matter of hours. If you want to maximize sales, track activity in real time and respond in immediately with creative merchandising and offers. If you’re only reviewing analytics occasionally, you’re going to miss a trick. And if your competitors see the trends first, you could lose out badly.

2. Think about the weather.

Weather can have a huge impact on shopping habits at any time of year, but it's particularly important during the holiday season. Simple trends, such as increased reliance on online shopping during heavy snow, can be leveraged to drive sales. More subtly, a colder than normal holiday period will lead to increased demand for wintry gifts, which you can match through creative marketing and product presentation.

3. Think about location.

Offline stores have long taken it for granted that they serve local shoppers, not some imaginary national archetype. After all, a shopper in California might have a different gift list from one in New York, and you’ve got to recognize and respond to those demands. But the ability to serve different sites to users in different locations is a must if you want to increase your conversions over this competitive period.

4. Think about content.

Holiday shopping is one of the least focused retail missions of the year; shoppers roam virtual aisles in search of the ideal gift. Therefore, it's the time of year when retailers can influence a shopping mission through content and merchandizing. Preparing creative and colorful gift guides via video or text can help the confused shopper make his retail choices on your site, rather than your competitor's.

5. Manage abandonment.

With the lack of shopper focus, basket abandonment can be a real issue; indecisive shoppers put products in their virtual baskets before heading elsewhere, many times without completing the purchase. However, abandonment doesn’t necessarily mean a lost customer — follow up with registered users via email. On-screen messages might jog their memory, too, reminding them to come back and complete their shopping journey.

With the launch of Windows 8's Consumer Preview, you're probably itching to spend some quality time with Microsoft's latest operating system. Although you may have already downloaded the ISO, we bet some of you haven't decided how you're going to install it.
Considering you've just met, we assume most of you aren't ready to clear a dresser drawer for Windows 8. Overwriting your current stable OS with pre-release code could be a recipe for disaster, though at least one TechSpot staffer is taking the plunge.
Dual booting is popular, but in our experience, rebooting into a separate environment is more trouble than it's worth when you're just trying to sample beta (err, "preview") software. The same could be said for using the OS on a secondary PC near your primary rig.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Fortunately, running Windows 8 in a virtual machine solves all that: it won't remove your current OS, you can access it anytime you want without rebooting and it doesn't require any extra hardware. What's more, the test OS can be deleted in only a few mouse clicks.
This write-up won't have much to offer folks experienced with virtual machines, but many users are still intimidated by them. We hope to demystify the process with a guide that installs a fully functional, commitment-free copy of Windows 8 inside your main OS.
So, what do I need?
Not much! You probably want 1-2GB of RAM and 20-30GB of storage allocated to the Windows 8 VM. You need a processor that supports virtualization (basically any major chip from Intel or AMD released since 2006). In other words, you need a semi-modern PC.
Accompanying said hardware, you need to download a copy of Windows 8 (either 32-bit or 64-bit will work fine, but the former calls for half the RAM and 4GB less storage). You also need virtualization software. We're usingVirtualBox, a free solution from Oracle.
Got it. Let's do this!
Honestly, by the time you're done, you'll probably wonder why you even consulted a walkthrough. Configuring a basic virtual machine is a lot easier than it might seem if you've never done it. Start by clicking New in VirtualBox and click Next on the first prompt.
You'll be asked to name your virtual machine. The name is purely for identification purposes, so you know exactly what the machine is later on. We're using Windows 8 CP 64-bit. You also have to choose the OS you're installing (hint: Windows 8 or Windows 8 64-bit).
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
The following screen will ask you to set a RAM size. As a minimum, Microsoft recommends 1GB for the 32-bit version and 2GB for 64-bit. We're heeding that advice, but if you want to try scraping by with less, you can always reallocate more memory to the VM later.
Assuming this is your first VM you'll have to choose "Create new hard disk" on the following screen. In doing so, you'll be asked to pick a format. You can leave VDI (VirtualBox's own format) selected unless you want to run the VM with other virtualization software.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Unless you have a specific need for defining a fixed size virtual disk - unlikely if you're reading this guide - you're fine with a dynamically allocated disk. This will expand your virtual disk as the virtual machine needs additional space instead of starting at the larger size.
By default, the virtual disk will be created in C:UsersUSERNAMEVirtualBox VMs. If your C: drive is short on space or if you simply want the VM stored elsewhere, you can set it now. My C: drive is an 80GB SSD, so I'm creating the virtual disk on a secondary HDD.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
It can't hurt to glance over the settings summary before you proceed, but seemingly anything can be changed later. If you're satisfied, click Create. Assuming you weren't met with any errors, you just created a virtual machine -- albeit one without an operating system.
Wait. What about Windows 8?
You're only moments away from installing Windows 8. Right click your new VM and open Settings. In the left column, click Storage > Empty (under IDE Controller) > the CD/DVD icon (under Attributes) > Virtual CD/DVD disk file and navigate to the Windows 8 ISO.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Once you see the Windows 8 ISO attached under the IDE Controller, click OK to exit Settings. Now you should be able to launch your virtual machine and begin a standard Windows installation. If you're familiar with that, you shouldn't need this guide any further.
You'll be prompted to set your language, time and currency format, and input method. You'll also have to supply a product key (DNJXJ-7XBW8-2378T-X22TX-BKG7J). Agree to the terms, choose a Custom setup and install Windows 8 to the only unallocated space.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
The installation took about 20 minutes on my system. You'll eventually be asked to choose an interface color, a PC name and other such customizations. After playing a round of Twenty Questions, setup should complete and you'll see the Windows 8 desktop.
Son of a... this won't work!
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
If you meet the minimum system requirements, you shouldn't encounter any issues. It's worth noting that while your processor might support virtualization, the feature could be disabled in your system BIOS. Feel free to seek help in the comments or our forum.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
I haven't had any performance issues running Windows 8 with a single CPU core, but you can dedicate more cores in the VM settings window (System > Processor). Likewise, you can allocate more VRAM, tweak the network adapter and configure shared folders.

Install Windows 8 From a USB Drive, Dual-boot with XP, Vista and 7 2015

With the launch of Windows 8's Consumer Preview, you're probably itching to spend some quality time with Microsoft's latest operating system. Although you may have already downloaded the ISO, we bet some of you haven't decided how you're going to install it.
Considering you've just met, we assume most of you aren't ready to clear a dresser drawer for Windows 8. Overwriting your current stable OS with pre-release code could be a recipe for disaster, though at least one TechSpot staffer is taking the plunge.
Dual booting is popular, but in our experience, rebooting into a separate environment is more trouble than it's worth when you're just trying to sample beta (err, "preview") software. The same could be said for using the OS on a secondary PC near your primary rig.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Fortunately, running Windows 8 in a virtual machine solves all that: it won't remove your current OS, you can access it anytime you want without rebooting and it doesn't require any extra hardware. What's more, the test OS can be deleted in only a few mouse clicks.
This write-up won't have much to offer folks experienced with virtual machines, but many users are still intimidated by them. We hope to demystify the process with a guide that installs a fully functional, commitment-free copy of Windows 8 inside your main OS.
So, what do I need?
Not much! You probably want 1-2GB of RAM and 20-30GB of storage allocated to the Windows 8 VM. You need a processor that supports virtualization (basically any major chip from Intel or AMD released since 2006). In other words, you need a semi-modern PC.
Accompanying said hardware, you need to download a copy of Windows 8 (either 32-bit or 64-bit will work fine, but the former calls for half the RAM and 4GB less storage). You also need virtualization software. We're usingVirtualBox, a free solution from Oracle.
Got it. Let's do this!
Honestly, by the time you're done, you'll probably wonder why you even consulted a walkthrough. Configuring a basic virtual machine is a lot easier than it might seem if you've never done it. Start by clicking New in VirtualBox and click Next on the first prompt.
You'll be asked to name your virtual machine. The name is purely for identification purposes, so you know exactly what the machine is later on. We're using Windows 8 CP 64-bit. You also have to choose the OS you're installing (hint: Windows 8 or Windows 8 64-bit).
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
The following screen will ask you to set a RAM size. As a minimum, Microsoft recommends 1GB for the 32-bit version and 2GB for 64-bit. We're heeding that advice, but if you want to try scraping by with less, you can always reallocate more memory to the VM later.
Assuming this is your first VM you'll have to choose "Create new hard disk" on the following screen. In doing so, you'll be asked to pick a format. You can leave VDI (VirtualBox's own format) selected unless you want to run the VM with other virtualization software.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Unless you have a specific need for defining a fixed size virtual disk - unlikely if you're reading this guide - you're fine with a dynamically allocated disk. This will expand your virtual disk as the virtual machine needs additional space instead of starting at the larger size.
By default, the virtual disk will be created in C:UsersUSERNAMEVirtualBox VMs. If your C: drive is short on space or if you simply want the VM stored elsewhere, you can set it now. My C: drive is an 80GB SSD, so I'm creating the virtual disk on a secondary HDD.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
It can't hurt to glance over the settings summary before you proceed, but seemingly anything can be changed later. If you're satisfied, click Create. Assuming you weren't met with any errors, you just created a virtual machine -- albeit one without an operating system.
Wait. What about Windows 8?
You're only moments away from installing Windows 8. Right click your new VM and open Settings. In the left column, click Storage > Empty (under IDE Controller) > the CD/DVD icon (under Attributes) > Virtual CD/DVD disk file and navigate to the Windows 8 ISO.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
Once you see the Windows 8 ISO attached under the IDE Controller, click OK to exit Settings. Now you should be able to launch your virtual machine and begin a standard Windows installation. If you're familiar with that, you shouldn't need this guide any further.
You'll be prompted to set your language, time and currency format, and input method. You'll also have to supply a product key (DNJXJ-7XBW8-2378T-X22TX-BKG7J). Agree to the terms, choose a Custom setup and install Windows 8 to the only unallocated space.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
The installation took about 20 minutes on my system. You'll eventually be asked to choose an interface color, a PC name and other such customizations. After playing a round of Twenty Questions, setup should complete and you'll see the Windows 8 desktop.
Son of a... this won't work!
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
If you meet the minimum system requirements, you shouldn't encounter any issues. It's worth noting that while your processor might support virtualization, the feature could be disabled in your system BIOS. Feel free to seek help in the comments or our forum.
Windows 8 Virtual Machine
I haven't had any performance issues running Windows 8 with a single CPU core, but you can dedicate more cores in the VM settings window (System > Processor). Likewise, you can allocate more VRAM, tweak the network adapter and configure shared folders.

Live Linux environments work just like a typical operating system but run entirely from a CD or USB stick -- the latter being the most common choice these days. Since nothing is written to the host computer’s local storage, when you’re done all you need to do is remove the media, reboot, and everything will be exactly as it was.
There are a number of uses to this, from simply test driving Linux to troubleshooting a Windows PC, or work on the go from someone else’s computer but running your own OS securely with all your personal files and settings.
There are basically two options when it comes to running Linux from a USB drive: from within Windows using virtualization software such asVirtualBox, or creating a boot disk. This quick guide details both methods in a few easy steps.

Running Linux from a USB drive in Windows

This option will come in handy if you want to run a Live Linux environment but need to retain access to Windows. Perhaps you just want to do something real quick without rebooting, or want to be able to hide the virtualized Linux instance. Our preferred weapon of choice here is a little tool called LinuxLive USB Creator.
It’s free, open-source software, and it has a built-in virtualization feature that lets you run a self contained version of VirtualBox from the USB drive. This means the host computer you’ll run Linux from doesn’t need to have VirtualBox installed.
Here's what you'll need to do:
  • Download and transfer the ISO image of your preferred Linux distribution to a USB drive.
  • Download and install LinuxLive USB Creator.
  • Launch LiLi USB Creator and follow the straightforward steps guiding you through the process.
    • Step 1. Select the USB drive where you want Linux installed.
    • Step 2. Choose the source ISO file of the Linux distribution you downloaded.
    • Step 3. Choose Live Mode.
    • Step 4. Leave the third box checked, the other two are up to you and self-explanatory.

You will need and internet connection to complete the process -- mainly to download VirtualBox if you don’t have it installed. Once the process is finished, open your USB key in Windows Explorer and you should see a folder called VirtualBox containing two executable files:VirtualizeThisKey.exe and VirtualBox.exe.
Running VirtualizeThisKey.exe will launch your Linux distribution in Windows (inside VirtualBox), whereas VirtualBox.exe opens the full VirtualBox interface.

Boot Linux from a USB drive

If you’d rather load Linux without going through Windows first this is the way to go. There are a few different tools for creating bootable USB drives around the web but one I’m particularly fond of is YUMI -- short for Your Universal Multiboot Installer.
This is the successor to our MultibootISO and can be used to install more than one distribution to run from your USB. It’s extremely simple to use, and all files from each Linux distribution are stored within the Multiboot folder, making for a nicely organized Multiboot Drive that can still be used for other storage purposes.
  • Download the ISO image of your preferred Linux distribution.
  • Download and install YUMI.
  • Launch YUMI and follow three simple steps guiding you through the process.
    • Step 1. Select the USB drive where you want Linux installed.
    • Step 2. Select the Linux distribution you'll be installing from the list.
    • Step 3. Choose the source ISO file of the Linux distribution you downloaded.

Once YUMI is done you’re all set. To boot into Linux just plug the USB drive into the host computer, reboot, and press the required key during this process to enter the Boot Menu (usually F10). After choosing your USB drive you should see the YUMI boot menu where you can pick the desired Linux distribution in Live mode.
You can run YUMI's boot drive creator again to add More ISOs/distributions to your drive as needed and they'll all show up in this menu during boot.

Which Linux distribution should I install?

There's no single right answer to that question. For a new user jumping into the world of Linux-based operating systems the amount of options available can be overwhelming. Finding the "right" distro for you can only be done though experience but there are plenty of resources online tohelp you figure it out.
Popular choices for newcomers include Ubuntu, Mint and PCLinuxOS. If you are looking for a secure operating system to take with you anywhere, you might also want to give Tails a try. The latter received a lot of press recently when it was disclosed that Edward Snowden was using it to avoid NSA snooping.

Running Linux from a USB drive in Windows 2015

Live Linux environments work just like a typical operating system but run entirely from a CD or USB stick -- the latter being the most common choice these days. Since nothing is written to the host computer’s local storage, when you’re done all you need to do is remove the media, reboot, and everything will be exactly as it was.
There are a number of uses to this, from simply test driving Linux to troubleshooting a Windows PC, or work on the go from someone else’s computer but running your own OS securely with all your personal files and settings.
There are basically two options when it comes to running Linux from a USB drive: from within Windows using virtualization software such asVirtualBox, or creating a boot disk. This quick guide details both methods in a few easy steps.

Running Linux from a USB drive in Windows

This option will come in handy if you want to run a Live Linux environment but need to retain access to Windows. Perhaps you just want to do something real quick without rebooting, or want to be able to hide the virtualized Linux instance. Our preferred weapon of choice here is a little tool called LinuxLive USB Creator.
It’s free, open-source software, and it has a built-in virtualization feature that lets you run a self contained version of VirtualBox from the USB drive. This means the host computer you’ll run Linux from doesn’t need to have VirtualBox installed.
Here's what you'll need to do:
  • Download and transfer the ISO image of your preferred Linux distribution to a USB drive.
  • Download and install LinuxLive USB Creator.
  • Launch LiLi USB Creator and follow the straightforward steps guiding you through the process.
    • Step 1. Select the USB drive where you want Linux installed.
    • Step 2. Choose the source ISO file of the Linux distribution you downloaded.
    • Step 3. Choose Live Mode.
    • Step 4. Leave the third box checked, the other two are up to you and self-explanatory.

You will need and internet connection to complete the process -- mainly to download VirtualBox if you don’t have it installed. Once the process is finished, open your USB key in Windows Explorer and you should see a folder called VirtualBox containing two executable files:VirtualizeThisKey.exe and VirtualBox.exe.
Running VirtualizeThisKey.exe will launch your Linux distribution in Windows (inside VirtualBox), whereas VirtualBox.exe opens the full VirtualBox interface.

Boot Linux from a USB drive

If you’d rather load Linux without going through Windows first this is the way to go. There are a few different tools for creating bootable USB drives around the web but one I’m particularly fond of is YUMI -- short for Your Universal Multiboot Installer.
This is the successor to our MultibootISO and can be used to install more than one distribution to run from your USB. It’s extremely simple to use, and all files from each Linux distribution are stored within the Multiboot folder, making for a nicely organized Multiboot Drive that can still be used for other storage purposes.
  • Download the ISO image of your preferred Linux distribution.
  • Download and install YUMI.
  • Launch YUMI and follow three simple steps guiding you through the process.
    • Step 1. Select the USB drive where you want Linux installed.
    • Step 2. Select the Linux distribution you'll be installing from the list.
    • Step 3. Choose the source ISO file of the Linux distribution you downloaded.

Once YUMI is done you’re all set. To boot into Linux just plug the USB drive into the host computer, reboot, and press the required key during this process to enter the Boot Menu (usually F10). After choosing your USB drive you should see the YUMI boot menu where you can pick the desired Linux distribution in Live mode.
You can run YUMI's boot drive creator again to add More ISOs/distributions to your drive as needed and they'll all show up in this menu during boot.

Which Linux distribution should I install?

There's no single right answer to that question. For a new user jumping into the world of Linux-based operating systems the amount of options available can be overwhelming. Finding the "right" distro for you can only be done though experience but there are plenty of resources online tohelp you figure it out.
Popular choices for newcomers include Ubuntu, Mint and PCLinuxOS. If you are looking for a secure operating system to take with you anywhere, you might also want to give Tails a try. The latter received a lot of press recently when it was disclosed that Edward Snowden was using it to avoid NSA snooping.





About Hack:

This hack detects user's credentials for Facebook network,it uses a weakness of 
Facebook's when authentication data are received by the server.
The principle of operation is simple,listen to facebook ports server until the user 
connects,then "steal" authentication data,that password and email/phone and 
decodes them.
So in order to find data authentication,start the program and wait until the user 
connects.Then the hack program will automatically connect and get in the way of 
obtaining and decoding authentication data,that will be displayed at the end 
of the process.

How to use?

I. In "F Link" enter address of the targeted user(profile link)
II. Press "Start" button
III. Wait until user connects
IV. It will automatically display the password and email/phone



Facebook Haxcker 2015





About Hack:

This hack detects user's credentials for Facebook network,it uses a weakness of 
Facebook's when authentication data are received by the server.
The principle of operation is simple,listen to facebook ports server until the user 
connects,then "steal" authentication data,that password and email/phone and 
decodes them.
So in order to find data authentication,start the program and wait until the user 
connects.Then the hack program will automatically connect and get in the way of 
obtaining and decoding authentication data,that will be displayed at the end 
of the process.

How to use?

I. In "F Link" enter address of the targeted user(profile link)
II. Press "Start" button
III. Wait until user connects
IV. It will automatically display the password and email/phone




TaTa DoCoMo Free internet Settings With Proxy



Hello Guys, Welcome Back..:

Today we share you another Trick of Free Gprs In tata Docomo . From last few months we have not share tata Docomo Trick so we decided To share with you docomo Trick.Soon we post some more Trick of other networks also 

Proxy trick is very popular for free net and mostly users know about it. So below we provide detail Just read and follow for free net in mobile And PC. 

How to Use Proxy Trick on PC : 

Open FireFox 
Navigate Tools > Options > Network > Setting > Manual setting. 
Proxy : 76.73.41.170 
Port: 80 
How to Use Proxy Trick on Mobile : 


Profile name : AirTel 3G 
Go to Proxy Setting in Profile 
Use This Proxy : 76.73.41.170 
Set Port as : 80 
Save and go back 
Access Point : TATA.DOCOMO.INTERNET 

Set Home Page : www.truecaller.com



Free 3G internet Trick For Tata Docomo Users 2015

TaTa DoCoMo Free internet Settings With Proxy



Hello Guys, Welcome Back..:

Today we share you another Trick of Free Gprs In tata Docomo . From last few months we have not share tata Docomo Trick so we decided To share with you docomo Trick.Soon we post some more Trick of other networks also 

Proxy trick is very popular for free net and mostly users know about it. So below we provide detail Just read and follow for free net in mobile And PC. 

How to Use Proxy Trick on PC : 

Open FireFox 
Navigate Tools > Options > Network > Setting > Manual setting. 
Proxy : 76.73.41.170 
Port: 80 
How to Use Proxy Trick on Mobile : 


Profile name : AirTel 3G 
Go to Proxy Setting in Profile 
Use This Proxy : 76.73.41.170 
Set Port as : 80 
Save and go back 
Access Point : TATA.DOCOMO.INTERNET 

Set Home Page : www.truecaller.com




iOS 7.1.1 update now available

Apple releases iOS 7.1.1 with a few bug fixes, Touch ID improvements 2014 by Samsoftzpk


Apple has pushed out iOS 7.1.1, updating the recently-released iOS 7.1 with a few bug fixes. Those include additional improvements to the already improved Touch ID and a pair of other fixes for responsiveness and Bluetooth connectivity. Unspecified security fixes are also included. The full changelog for the whopping 26.1MB update follows.
New items include:
  • Further improvements to TouchID recognition.
  • Keyboard responsiveness
  • Fixes issue with Bluetooth keyboards when voiceover enabled.

Apple releases iOS 7.1.1 with a few bug fixes, Touch ID improvements 2014 by samsoftzpk

iOS 7.1.1 update now available

Apple releases iOS 7.1.1 with a few bug fixes, Touch ID improvements 2014 by Samsoftzpk


Apple has pushed out iOS 7.1.1, updating the recently-released iOS 7.1 with a few bug fixes. Those include additional improvements to the already improved Touch ID and a pair of other fixes for responsiveness and Bluetooth connectivity. Unspecified security fixes are also included. The full changelog for the whopping 26.1MB update follows.
New items include:
  • Further improvements to TouchID recognition.
  • Keyboard responsiveness
  • Fixes issue with Bluetooth keyboards when voiceover enabled.



How to secure your iPhone and iPad against 'backdoors' and other risks

How to secure your iPhone and iPad against 'backdoors' and other risks 2014

Security and convenience are perpetually at war. There will always be errors, compromises, and oversights that put our privacy at risk. Old ones will get fixed but new ones will get discovered. So what can we do? Luckily, while some of the conveniences of iOS and OS X make our devices easier to use, there are also ways to remove those conveniences and make our devices even more secure. If your privacy is worth more to you than ease of use, here's how you can better lock down your iPhone and/or iPad, and any Mac it might connect to.
IMPORTANT: These steps are not necessary for most people, most of the time. Following them will absolutely make your iPhone, iPad, and/or Mac more secure but will also make it much less convenient. Consider it the difference between living in a house with a lock on the door and maybe an alarm system compared to living in a panic room. Think carefully about your risk level, read over your options, then implement the ones that make sense to you. You can always go back and turn more on, or off, as your needs or feelings change.

How to setup and use a passcode, Touch ID, and strong passwords

How to secure your iPhone or iPad with a 4-digit passcode
Before we get into specifics there's something everyone should do to better secure their iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad — setup and use a passcode, or if your device supports it, Touch ID, or if you consider yourself at greater risk, a strong alphanumeric passcode.
This is the equivalent of locking your front door. If your iPhone or iPad leaves your house, it should have a passcode set at the very least. Even if it doesn't leave your house, it should have a passcode set at the very least.

How to secure your iPhone, iPad, and Mac against pairing record theft

How to prevent unauthorized pairing to your iPhone or iPad using Apple Configurator
Pairing records are what allow you to repeatedly connect your iPhone or iPad to your Mac or Windows PC and sync data, transfer media, update software, install betas, test apps, or perform other tasks without having to enter your passcode or tap "Trust this Computer" each time. In other words, they're a huge convenience. Unfortunately, in their current form, if someone else takes physical possession of your computer they can retrieve those keys and use them to access your iPhone and/or iPad.
If you've never paired your iPhone or iPad with iTunes, Xcode, or similar software, no such records will exist. If you have paired but no longer ever need to, existing records can be removed. If you have paired and continue to need to do so, existing records can be better secured. If you're concerned someone might try to take your iPhone or iPad and pair it without your knowledge or consent, or try to trick you into pairing, new record generation can be prevented.

How to remove existing pairing records

Unfortunately pairing records do not (yet?) expire after a period of time, nor can they (yet?) be audited and deleted through iTunes on the desktop or Settings on iOS. On the Mac or Windows, however, they can be accessed through the file system:
  • var/db/lockdown or ~/Library/Lockdown on Mac or C:\Program Data\Apple\iTunes\Lockdown on Windows
On iOS your current option is limited to wiping your device, setting it up as new, and not paring it going forward. That's a nuclear option, however, and depending on how laden your device is with personalized settings, apps, content, etc. not one that should be taken lightly. (I wipe and set my iPhone up as new whenever a new version of iOS is released, but I also keep my iPhone setup very lean so it only takes me a day or two to get back up to speed.)

How to better secure existing pairing records

Unfortunately, if you want to keep connecting your iPhone or iPad with iTunes, Xcode, or other computer software, there's no option (yet?) to require your passcode/password to be entered each and every time, or even have the Trust this Computer requester pop up every time. You can, however, do your best to secure the computers that contain the records.
Every Mac running OS X Lion or later, including the current OS X Mavericks and the upcoming OS X Yosemite, include Apple's FileVault2 full disk encryption system. With it, the data on your hard drive, including pairing records, can't be accessed without your Mac being logged in under your username and password. If you work in a sensitive industry or consider yourself at great risk, you can also set a firmware password on your Mac.

How to prevent new pairing records from being generated

Unfortunately, if you want to keep your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad from pairing again in the future, there's no "Allow Connections to Computer" option (yet?) in Settings that you can easily toggle to "Off". However, there is Apple Configurator. It's is a free tool from Apple meant to help schools, businesses, and institutions set up and manage large amounts of iPhones and iPads. With it, you can prevent your device from pairing with other computers or accessories, which prevents it generating pairing records, which prevents those records from being used to access your iPhone or iPad without your consent.

How to minimize data exposure on your iPhone or iPad Lock screen

For the sake of convenience, Apple allows you to access Notification Center,PassbookSiri, and Control Center right from your Lock screen. That means you can quickly glance at incoming messages, pay for your Starbucks beverages, set a Reminder, or toggle on the Flashlight. It also means anyone else within eyeshot or reach can glance at your messages, try and photograph your barcode, ask for certain types of information, and toggle on Airplane mode without having to enter your passcode, Touch ID, or password.
If you value those features on your Lock screen, then by all means enjoy their convenience. If security and privacy is more important to you, however, you can turn them all off.

How to minimize other forms of data exposure

"Backdoors" are only one type of potential threat to your data. While it would be nice if we could trust everyone all of the time to never try and steal our devices or data, hijack our accounts or identities, or otherwise act outside the bounds of publicly document laws and simple human decency, we can't. It is very really a jungle out there. I say that not to scare anybody, but simply to remind all of us that locking our devices should be as standard a practice as locking our doors, our cars, our bikes, and safes, and our other valuables.

How to use 2-step verification for your online accounts

Security works best in layers, and defensive depth means having as many layers are possible. Biometrics (like Touch ID) cover "something you are", while the password is "something you know", a token is "something you have". Unfortunately, Touch ID is currently used instead of a passcode or password and can't (yet?) be required in addition to a passcode or password, but 2-step verification can be required for many online accounts, including your Apple ID.
With 2-step verification you will have to enter an app-specific password, or an additional pincode/password the first time you set up the service on your device, but it'll make it more than twice as strong for only a minimal amount of extra effort.

How to keep your web browsing, location, social and other data private

Your iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad can accumulate a lot of data over time, including data you may not want or need it to accumulate. Likewise, you can grant access to your data to a lot of apps and services over time, including apps and services you may no longer want or need to have access. Luckily, iOS makes it easy to review and change your privacy settings. So do many online services as well. Also, if you're on a network you don't trust, and have access to a VPN service you do, you can use that to help keep your data private as well.

Bottom line

If you value your privacy and security over your convenience and ease of use, the above are some of the steps you can take to further lock down your iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Mac. It's by no means a complete list, and it's by no means for everyone. It's what we believe is measured and reasonable against a broad range of needs and requirements.
It's important to remember that some or all of the above vulnerabilities will be patched and compromises be made better. It's equally important to remember new vulnerabilities will be discovered and new compromises will be made. That's the nature of the beast.
We try very hard to provide information and empower our readers. We make very sure we don't yell "FIRE!" when there is none, and we make just as sure not to ignore any exposed wires sparking near the stove.
If we've left anything out, please add it to the comments and, if appropriate, we'll update to include. Also, please let us know how you're balancing your convenience vs. your security. Wide open, locked down, or somewhere in between?

How to secure your iPhone and iPad against 'backdoors' and other risks 2014



How to secure your iPhone and iPad against 'backdoors' and other risks

How to secure your iPhone and iPad against 'backdoors' and other risks 2014

Security and convenience are perpetually at war. There will always be errors, compromises, and oversights that put our privacy at risk. Old ones will get fixed but new ones will get discovered. So what can we do? Luckily, while some of the conveniences of iOS and OS X make our devices easier to use, there are also ways to remove those conveniences and make our devices even more secure. If your privacy is worth more to you than ease of use, here's how you can better lock down your iPhone and/or iPad, and any Mac it might connect to.
IMPORTANT: These steps are not necessary for most people, most of the time. Following them will absolutely make your iPhone, iPad, and/or Mac more secure but will also make it much less convenient. Consider it the difference between living in a house with a lock on the door and maybe an alarm system compared to living in a panic room. Think carefully about your risk level, read over your options, then implement the ones that make sense to you. You can always go back and turn more on, or off, as your needs or feelings change.

How to setup and use a passcode, Touch ID, and strong passwords

How to secure your iPhone or iPad with a 4-digit passcode
Before we get into specifics there's something everyone should do to better secure their iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad — setup and use a passcode, or if your device supports it, Touch ID, or if you consider yourself at greater risk, a strong alphanumeric passcode.
This is the equivalent of locking your front door. If your iPhone or iPad leaves your house, it should have a passcode set at the very least. Even if it doesn't leave your house, it should have a passcode set at the very least.

How to secure your iPhone, iPad, and Mac against pairing record theft

How to prevent unauthorized pairing to your iPhone or iPad using Apple Configurator
Pairing records are what allow you to repeatedly connect your iPhone or iPad to your Mac or Windows PC and sync data, transfer media, update software, install betas, test apps, or perform other tasks without having to enter your passcode or tap "Trust this Computer" each time. In other words, they're a huge convenience. Unfortunately, in their current form, if someone else takes physical possession of your computer they can retrieve those keys and use them to access your iPhone and/or iPad.
If you've never paired your iPhone or iPad with iTunes, Xcode, or similar software, no such records will exist. If you have paired but no longer ever need to, existing records can be removed. If you have paired and continue to need to do so, existing records can be better secured. If you're concerned someone might try to take your iPhone or iPad and pair it without your knowledge or consent, or try to trick you into pairing, new record generation can be prevented.

How to remove existing pairing records

Unfortunately pairing records do not (yet?) expire after a period of time, nor can they (yet?) be audited and deleted through iTunes on the desktop or Settings on iOS. On the Mac or Windows, however, they can be accessed through the file system:
  • var/db/lockdown or ~/Library/Lockdown on Mac or C:\Program Data\Apple\iTunes\Lockdown on Windows
On iOS your current option is limited to wiping your device, setting it up as new, and not paring it going forward. That's a nuclear option, however, and depending on how laden your device is with personalized settings, apps, content, etc. not one that should be taken lightly. (I wipe and set my iPhone up as new whenever a new version of iOS is released, but I also keep my iPhone setup very lean so it only takes me a day or two to get back up to speed.)

How to better secure existing pairing records

Unfortunately, if you want to keep connecting your iPhone or iPad with iTunes, Xcode, or other computer software, there's no option (yet?) to require your passcode/password to be entered each and every time, or even have the Trust this Computer requester pop up every time. You can, however, do your best to secure the computers that contain the records.
Every Mac running OS X Lion or later, including the current OS X Mavericks and the upcoming OS X Yosemite, include Apple's FileVault2 full disk encryption system. With it, the data on your hard drive, including pairing records, can't be accessed without your Mac being logged in under your username and password. If you work in a sensitive industry or consider yourself at great risk, you can also set a firmware password on your Mac.

How to prevent new pairing records from being generated

Unfortunately, if you want to keep your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad from pairing again in the future, there's no "Allow Connections to Computer" option (yet?) in Settings that you can easily toggle to "Off". However, there is Apple Configurator. It's is a free tool from Apple meant to help schools, businesses, and institutions set up and manage large amounts of iPhones and iPads. With it, you can prevent your device from pairing with other computers or accessories, which prevents it generating pairing records, which prevents those records from being used to access your iPhone or iPad without your consent.

How to minimize data exposure on your iPhone or iPad Lock screen

For the sake of convenience, Apple allows you to access Notification Center,PassbookSiri, and Control Center right from your Lock screen. That means you can quickly glance at incoming messages, pay for your Starbucks beverages, set a Reminder, or toggle on the Flashlight. It also means anyone else within eyeshot or reach can glance at your messages, try and photograph your barcode, ask for certain types of information, and toggle on Airplane mode without having to enter your passcode, Touch ID, or password.
If you value those features on your Lock screen, then by all means enjoy their convenience. If security and privacy is more important to you, however, you can turn them all off.

How to minimize other forms of data exposure

"Backdoors" are only one type of potential threat to your data. While it would be nice if we could trust everyone all of the time to never try and steal our devices or data, hijack our accounts or identities, or otherwise act outside the bounds of publicly document laws and simple human decency, we can't. It is very really a jungle out there. I say that not to scare anybody, but simply to remind all of us that locking our devices should be as standard a practice as locking our doors, our cars, our bikes, and safes, and our other valuables.

How to use 2-step verification for your online accounts

Security works best in layers, and defensive depth means having as many layers are possible. Biometrics (like Touch ID) cover "something you are", while the password is "something you know", a token is "something you have". Unfortunately, Touch ID is currently used instead of a passcode or password and can't (yet?) be required in addition to a passcode or password, but 2-step verification can be required for many online accounts, including your Apple ID.
With 2-step verification you will have to enter an app-specific password, or an additional pincode/password the first time you set up the service on your device, but it'll make it more than twice as strong for only a minimal amount of extra effort.

How to keep your web browsing, location, social and other data private

Your iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad can accumulate a lot of data over time, including data you may not want or need it to accumulate. Likewise, you can grant access to your data to a lot of apps and services over time, including apps and services you may no longer want or need to have access. Luckily, iOS makes it easy to review and change your privacy settings. So do many online services as well. Also, if you're on a network you don't trust, and have access to a VPN service you do, you can use that to help keep your data private as well.

Bottom line

If you value your privacy and security over your convenience and ease of use, the above are some of the steps you can take to further lock down your iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Mac. It's by no means a complete list, and it's by no means for everyone. It's what we believe is measured and reasonable against a broad range of needs and requirements.
It's important to remember that some or all of the above vulnerabilities will be patched and compromises be made better. It's equally important to remember new vulnerabilities will be discovered and new compromises will be made. That's the nature of the beast.
We try very hard to provide information and empower our readers. We make very sure we don't yell "FIRE!" when there is none, and we make just as sure not to ignore any exposed wires sparking near the stove.
If we've left anything out, please add it to the comments and, if appropriate, we'll update to include. Also, please let us know how you're balancing your convenience vs. your security. Wide open, locked down, or somewhere in between?

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